Nerdcore since '84
I have a name, but eveyone calls me Goose
501st/ TK Bear Crew member
Costumes, props, nsfw

Just a TK girl on a Saturday night, and a simple girl trying to make my way in the universe.

 

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

zygoma:

Self-surgery is the act of performing a surgical procedure on oneself. It can be a rare manifestation of a psychological disorder, an attempt to avoid embarrassment or legal action, or an act taken in extreme circumstances out of necessity.
On April 30, 1961, Dr. Leonid Rogozov removed his own infected appendix at the Soviet Novolazarevskaja Research Station in Antarctica, as he was the only physician on staff. The operation lasted one hour and 45 minutes.    Rogozov later reported on the surgery in the Information Bulletin of the Soviet Antarctic Expedition

(via strongdeformity)

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

zygoma:

Self-surgery is the act of performing a surgical procedure on oneself. It can be a rare manifestation of a psychological disorder, an attempt to avoid embarrassment or legal action, or an act taken in extreme circumstances out of necessity.

On April 30, 1961, Dr. Leonid Rogozov removed his own infected appendix at the Soviet Novolazarevskaja Research Station in Antarctica, as he was the only physician on staff. The operation lasted one hour and 45 minutes.    Rogozov later reported on the surgery in the Information Bulletin of the Soviet Antarctic Expedition

(via strongdeformity)

discoverynews:

Now Showing: Movie Clips From Your Mind
Blurry images taken from the human brain reveal movie clips just watched by test subjects.

For the reconstructed brain videos, the team drew from a separate  library of 18 million seconds of YouTube video clips selected at random.  If the brain activity measurements are good and the model is accurate,  their process should find the clip from the library most similar to the  video actually viewed.
The result was a set of blurry, ghostly continuous videos approximating what the subjects were watching.
“You’re reconstructing a movie that they saw using other movies that  they didn’t actually see,” Gallant said. This counterintuitive approach  is key for proving the decoder works.

This is amazing

discoverynews:

Now Showing: Movie Clips From Your Mind

Blurry images taken from the human brain reveal movie clips just watched by test subjects.

For the reconstructed brain videos, the team drew from a separate library of 18 million seconds of YouTube video clips selected at random. If the brain activity measurements are good and the model is accurate, their process should find the clip from the library most similar to the video actually viewed.

The result was a set of blurry, ghostly continuous videos approximating what the subjects were watching.

“You’re reconstructing a movie that they saw using other movies that they didn’t actually see,” Gallant said. This counterintuitive approach is key for proving the decoder works.

This is amazing